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Forestry

My Favorite Images of 2015: Macro/Close-up

Happy New Year to all! Each new year brings hope and the prospect of new opportunities for us to pursue.

On April 23, I will host my first Spring Flower Workshop. You will notice that I do not always use a macro lens to capture a nice sharp close-up.  A good zoom lens (like the one your received if you purchased a kit) will give you the range you need to create wonderful close-up images. If your zoom says “macro” on it, you will be able to get a little closer than you would with a regular zoom lens. It is not a 1:1 macro, but you should be able to get close enough to capture many of the small details in your image. I wanted to share some of my macro/close-up images from 2015 to inspire you to get out and explore your surroundings!

This first group of images was taken in Colorado at Garden of the Gods. I saw this as the life span of a thistle. Through the series you can see how it changes over time. These were taken with my Tamron 24 – 75mm f/2.8. I often use it as a carry around lens and it has great close-up capabilities. I love how it blurs the background, but keeps the main image sharp.

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White Trillium

This image will always be special to me. It was taken at the Shoot the Hills weekend photography competition. You are not able to edit your images and you have to choose your best image in each category (approximately 6 images) and turn those in to the judges.  The white trillium was taken with my Sigma 105mm Macro lens using the ring flash. This was my first time participating in the competition; the image won an honorable mention in the Flora Category.

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Here Kitty!

While not a flower; this cat is a nice example of a close-up image. Eyes are in focus and looking straight into the camera!  I had put my camera on the ground and “hoped” it would focus on the right area.  Again, this was taken with my Tamron 24 – 75mm f/2.8.

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Intersecting Lines

I enjoy experimenting with textures and other processing techniques. I try to look for interesting forms and shapes in my surroundings.  This was taken at the Huntington Museum of Art Conservatory. It is a wonderful place to take photographs. Most of the time is is not crowded and it is great to go to on a cold day. The palm branch was processed using the On1 Photo system.

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Follow the Line

I also look for leading lines. The vine entwined itself along the branch of this plant. There is a nice curve for the eye to follow.

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Young Coneflower

Young Coneflower was an image I enjoyed experimenting with. I had photographed the coneflower in front as it developed over several days. I wanted a nice linen texture and painterly feel. I used a combination of Oil Paint filter in Photoshop and did texture layering using On1 Photo. I had it printed on metallic paper with a linen texture. It does have the look and feel of a painting.

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All Alone

This was taken in North Carolina at Thanksgiving. I saw the “lone” leaf sticking up off of a branch in the woods.  This was photographed with my Sigma 120 – 300mm f2.8.  The image was processed in Lightroom.

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Purple Basil

In my opinion, I saved the best for last!  My image, Purple Basil, was captured with the LensBaby Spark.  The Spark comes with multiple disks that you can insert to create interesting shapes out of light.  I did very little processing to this image; just basic adjustments using Lightroom. The morning sun was hitting the leaf just right. I had only a couple of minutes to photograph the leaf and the light was gone!  I print this image on metallic paper and also have had a metal print created. The highly saturated colors pop on the metallic mediums. It won an Honorable Mention at the Foothills Competition in the fall.

I hope you have enjoyed the 2015 recap of my favorite images!  I look forward to sharing more information in 2016!

Watch for notices of my classes and workshops for the upcoming year!

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Senior Photographs: Nelson

I had the pleasure of photographing a friend of mine’s grandson.  I have known Nelson for almost 10 years; it is difficult to imagine him as a senior in high school.  To me he will always be the freckled face little boy who liked to ride bikes at the campground.  Nelson has always been a polite young man and I wish the best for him in the future!

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Nelson posing next to his truck.

Nelson is a sportsman. He enjoys archery, hunting, fishing, boating…you name it!  They chose the location for his senior photographs; a cabin in the woods!  It was about an hour drive from Chillicothe into Hocking County.  It was an ideal location for Nelson’s photographs.  It was on the cool side and the sun was out.  With the dense forest we had a little shadow play from time to time.  Occasionally I called upon my daughter to help with a reflector to help fill in the areas if the shadows were too strong.

Without the reflector.

Without the reflector.

With the reflector

With the reflector

My assistant using the reflector to brighten the scenes

My assistant using the reflector to brighten the scenes

You can see how the reflector fills in the shadows to help produce more even lighting on the subject.

As mentioned above, Nelson is an excellent marksman particularly in archery.  He has won many awards and is ranked high in his age group. He has enjoyed deer hunting since he was a young boy.

Nelson pictured with his first shotgun

Nelson pictured with his first shotgun

Nelson and his deer scull

Nelson and his deer scull

Taking aim!

Taking aim!

Nelson’s brother Logan and step brother Brandon joined Nelson for a few informal photographs too.

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Logan and Nelson

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Logan, Nelson, and Brandon

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Logan, Nelson, and Brandon

The road to the future is waiting!

The road to the future is waiting!